August 29 News Download: Pacific Light Undersea Cable

Summary:

USA might block an undersea cable, going directly from L.A. to Hong Kong, from being built.

Passive word construction so let’s break down the details…

Whose undersea cable?

Dr. Peng Telecom and Media Group Co., which is the fourth biggest telecom operator in China, and also those key players we hear about all the time… Google and Facebook, Inc.

Together this is called the Pacific Light Network or the Pacific Light Data Communication Co.

Why would Pacific Light build this?

Demands for great data capacity.

This group wants more more more

-bandwidth in Asia

-& links to markets

in the Philippines

Photo by Christian Paul Del Rosario on Pexels.com

in Malaysia

Photo by Vincent Liew on Pexels.com

in Indonesia

Photo by Tom Fisk on Pexels.com

and, of course, more links to markets in Mainland China.

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

What do we call the opposition?

Team Telecom, made up of a panel of USA Representatives from the US Department of Homeland Security, approves or rejects applications for cable projects such as this international undersea cable project.

Why would Team Telecom reject Pacific Light’s undersea cable license application?

On the grounds of national security.

To signal a tougher stance on USA-China projects.

Growing distrust of Chinese ambitions (phrased as such by WSJ).

And what if rejection happens?

Well, data will move outside USA jurisdiction and still find its own way through other cables..

Wages in Cuba and a quote from my former Professor of Latin American Politics

Cuba announces increase in wages as part of economic reform

by Associated Press Thursday, June 27th 2019

The beginning:

“Every Cuban has the right to a salary increase,” said Dariel Tejeda, a 28-year-old tour guide. “The country and all the state workers have needed this for a long time.”

and the end:

Ending the dual-currency system is expected to lead to the eventual removal of subsidies and bankruptcy of dozens, even hundreds of state enterprises and the loss of many thousands of public sector jobs. With lower or no subsidies, state companies would be forced to raise prices. For that reason, a state salary increase has long been seen as a key precursor to monetary unification in Cuba.