How do the Chinese get calcium when they barely eat dairy?

In the Chinese diet, milk and cheese, the well-recognized sources of calcium and phosphorus, are not used. A typical Chinese dish, which is called ‘sweet-sour-spareribs,’ was analyzed as a possible source of these elements.

From this research:

“Sweet-sour-spareribs” was often consumed by a woman after she gave birth.

The vinegar extracted huge amounts of calcium from the bones, giving the mother a much-needed source of calcium as she nursed her child.

From Marks Daily Apple


Nuclear incidents in the 1950s

Excerpts below from the Nuclear Files Org.

13 February 1950
U.S.A., Pacific Ocean- A B-36 which developed serious mechanical difficulties on a simulated combat mission, dropped a nuclear weapon from 8,000 ft. over the Pacific Ocean before crashing.

Luckily only the weapon’s explosive material detonated.

Nothing is known of attempts to recover the nuclear weapon and presumably it is still in the ocean.

(The Defence Monitor Vol.X No.5 1981 Washington D.C. “The National Times” 15th March 1981)

Photo by Steve Johnson on Pexels.com

1959: San Fernando Valley, California, U.S.A.

“Radioactive genes were slowly and deliberately released into the air after a serious accident in a reactor just north of the populous San Fernando Valley.”

(Sources “From under the Rug” F.O.E. La Trobe University Vic.)

Soviet Spy Klaus Fuchs

In addition to providing Gold with secrets on the American atomic project, Fuchs also passed detailed information about the hydrogen bomb to the Soviet Union. Some experts estimate that Fuchs’ intelligence enabled the Soviets to develop and test their own atomic bomb one to two years earlier than otherwise expected.

Read more here: https://www.atomicheritage.org/profile/klaus-fuchs

озёрск / Ozersk

Those in paradise were given a choice: happiness without freedom, or freedom without happiness. There was no third alternative.

(From the dystopian novel We, by Yevgeny Zamyatin, 1924)

Deep in the vast forests of Russia’s Ural mountains lies the forbidden city of Ozersk. Behind guarded gates and barbed wire fences stands a beautiful enigma – a hypnotic place that seems to exist in a different dimension.

Codenamed City 40, Ozersk was the birthplace of the Soviet nuclear weapons programme after the second world war. For decades, this city of 100,000 people did not appear on any maps, and its inhabitants’ identities were erased from the Soviet census.

From this well written article on the closed city of Ozersk (озёрск) whose title really tells you something: “Grave Yard Earth – Inside City 40 Ozersk – Russian – Deadly Secret Nuclear

Vulnerability in Russian is уязвимость.

Pronounced as uyzvimost

Wired and fried, I’m out of sight.

My new friend and roommate laughs when the instant coffee I’m gulping down spills down my neck, down my chest, and onto my dress.

“Did you forgot how to swallow pills?”

Well, I forgot how to do anything.

Have you ever had your mind so preoccupied with something that your body starts accumulating bruises, scratches, sprains.

And then your thoughts run like so: bruises, broyses, spelled бройсес.